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COLLEGE OF EDUCATION, HEALTH AND REHABILITATION


LESSON PLAN FORMAT
Teacher’s Name: Ms. Caitlin Alexander Date of Lesson: 5 (Perspective)
Grade Level: 9th Grade Topic: Civil Wars in Rome
Objectives
Students will understand that Ancient Rome experienced multiple civil wars and periods of internal strife.
Students will know about Julius Caesar, Spartacus, the Slave Revolt, Josephus, First Jewish War.
Students will be able to compare enduring themes in the history of the world cross-culturally.

Maine Learning Results Alignment
Maine Learning Results:
Social Studies – E. History,
E1: Historical Knowledge, Concepts, Themes and Patterns
Analyze and critique major historical eras, major enduring themes, turning points, events, consequences, and people in the history of the world and the implications for the present and future.

Rationale: Students need to understand how to compare the varying themes and motivations behind the different civil wars in Rome, because many of the themes and motivations behind those wars are relevant to understanding why civil wars are fought today.
Assessment

Formative (Assessment for Learning)

Students will be given journals at the beginning of the unit, in which they will write and record their findings, what they thought about what was being taught, and what they might be confused about or might need clarified. These journals will give students time to reflect and think about what they have learned, and about what they might need to improve upon in the future. They will be given the chance to write in these journals at the end of every class.

Summative (Assessment of Learning)

Students will write an essay at the end of the lesson in which they will reflect upon the different civil wars that occurred during the history of Ancient Rome. They will compare the different civil wars that occurred, keeping in mind the causes and the outcomes of each individual war. Then the students will compare those wars to another known civil war in later history, and by doing so they will analyze the similarities and/or differences between these wars, and wars of the future.

Integration

Technology:

Students will use the program “Inspiration” to create a graphic organizer, in which they map out the causes, progression, and outcomes of individual civil wars. They will also use inspiration to create a timeline, in which they show the events which led up to, happened during, and happened after the civil war that they are studying.

Other Content Areas:

English: Students will use skills that they have developed in their English classes to write an essay analyzing the different civil wars in Ancient Roman history, and comparing/contrasting them with other civil wars in future history.


Groupings

Students will group up in teams of four and use the "Round Robin Brainstorming" to think up the different causes and effects for the different civil wars being studied.

Differentiated Instruction

Verbal-Linguistic: Students will debate the different causes and justifications for the different civil wars and instances in the history of the Roman Empire, and defend different sides of the conflict.
Logical/Mathematical: Students will create a timeline, showing the events preceding, occurring during, and occurring after the civil wars and times of civil strife in the Roman Empire.
Visual/Spatial: Students will create a concept web that shows the progression, causes, outcomes, and aftermaths of the civil wars.
Intrapersonal: Students will discuss the different causes of different civil wars during Roman History and compare and contrast the causes and effects.
Interpersonal: Students will write an essay, reflecting upon similarities and differences in civil wars and disturbances in Roman History.
Naturalist: Students will create an individual scale of importance for the different civil wars and use different animals from nature as the varying levels of complexity.




Modifications/Accommodations

I will review student’s IEP, 504 or ELLIDEP and make appropriate modifications and accommodations.
Absent: If a student is absent for a short period of time (1-3 classes) I will try and set up a mentor system during class between this student and one who has shown mastery of the material already, and the two will spend a short amount of time together during each class so that the absent student can catch up with the rest of the class. If this is not possible, then I will supply the student with specific readings and worksheets that will provide the information. If the student is absent for an extended period of time (more than three classes) I will try and coordinate a time before, during, or after school when that student might be able to come to visit me or spend time with a tutor to catch them up with the class. I will also post my content notes online so that any student can access them.

Extensions

The students will use “Inspiration” to create a timeline which shows the progression of events during the different wars in Rome, and they will also create a concept web showing the different themes and motivations behind each war. A gifted and talented student can create one or more extra timelines and concept webs comparing and contrasting the wars in Rome that they have already studied to different wars which occurred in history.
Materials, Resources and Technology

Laptops
The “Inspiration” program
Pencils
Paper
Textbooks
Source for Lesson Plan and Research


//Glencoe World History// "Chapter 5: Rome and the Rise of Christianity" –This chapter will be the textbook reading that will provide the foundations for their knowledge.
http://www.unrv.com/provinces/judaea.php - “Judea - Palestinia” This website gives a history of Roman influence in the province of Judea.
http://www.pbs.org/empires/romans/empire/josephus.html - A short overview of the First Jewish War in Judea.
World History: Ancient Civilizations textbook by Houghton Mifflin, Chapter 10, Lesson 3 Review Guide: Rome and Judea – Provides quick and easy facts about the Romans and their interactions with Judea and her people.
http://www.historynet.com/ancient-history-spartacus-and-the-slave-rebellion.htm - “Ancient History: Spartacus and the Slave Rebellion” – Provides information about the rebellion of Spartacus and other slaves during the Roman Republic.


Maine Standards for Initial Teacher Certification and Rationale

Standard 3 - Demonstrates a knowledge of the diverse ways in which students learn and develop by providing learning opportunities that support their intellectual, physical, emotional, social, and cultural development.
Rationale:

Beach ball: The creativity of different students will be embraced in the classroom, and through informal discussion between classmates and between the class and the teacher the students will have multiple opportunities to share their opinions. Through many different activities, including the poster projects, the students will be given the chance to express themselves artistically as well.

Microscope: One of the activities involves having the students read from the textbook, as well as from primary sources, which will stimulate students who are more research oriented, because it will engage them in a formal, tradition fashion of learning and information gathering.

Clipboard: Students will be presented with a list of terms (the terms in the content notes) and they will check off the terms when they feel that they completely understand them.


Puppy: All of the students in the classroom will feel safe and secure in discussions and when they share their ideas, opinions, or work, because my classroom policy will be to be accepting of all ideas, and I will expect my students to do the same.



Standard 4 - Plans instruction based upon knowledge of subject matter, students, curriculum goals, and learning and development theory.
Rationale:

This lesson will help educate students about the nature of civil war in Ancient Rome, and by understanding the causes and effects of civil wars in Rome they might better understand the overarching themes of conflict within the Empire and why the Empire would eventually fall. They will also be comparing and contrasting these civil wars with later civil wars, allowing them to see similar themes and differences. This lesson prescribes to the Maine Learning Results, which requires that the students be able to “Analyze and critique major historical eras, major enduring themes, turning points, events, consequences, and people in the history of the world and the implications for the present and future.” The students will be analyzing these civil wars and comparing them with other civil wars that Rome had fought, and the students will get the chance to see how they connect to other civil wars throughout history.

Standard 5 - Understands and uses a variety of instructional strategies and appropriate technology to meet students’ needs.
Rationale:

Verbal-Linguistic: Students will debate the different causes and justifications for the different civil wars and instances in the history of the Roman Empire, and defend different sides of the conflict.
Logical/Mathematical: Students will create a timeline using “Inspiration,” showing the events preceding, occurring during, and occurring after the civil wars and times of civil strife in the Roman Empire.
Visual/Spatial: Students will create a concept web using “Inspiration” that shows the progression, causes, outcomes, and aftermaths of the civil wars.
Intrapersonal: Students will discuss the different causes of different civil wars during Roman History and compare and contrast the causes and effects.
Interpersonal: Students will write an essay, reflecting upon similarities and differences in civil wars and disturbances in Roman History.
Naturalist: Students will create an individual scale of importance for the different civil wars and use different animals from nature as the varying levels of complexity.


Standard 8 - Understands and uses a variety of formal and informal assessment strategies to evaluate and support the development of the learner.
Rationale:
Formative (Assessment for Learning)

Students will be given journals at the beginning of the unit, in which they will write and record their findings, what they thought about what was being taught, and what they might be confused about or might need clarified. These journals will give students time to reflect and think about what they have learned, and about what they might need to improve upon in the future. They will be given the chance to write in these journals at the end of every class.

Summative (Assessment of Learning)

Students will write an essay at the end of the lesson in which they will reflect upon the different civil wars that occurred during the history of Ancient Rome. They will compare the different civil wars that occurred, keeping in mind the causes and the outcomes of each individual war. Then the students will compare those wars to another known civil war in later history, and by doing so they will analyze the similarities and/or differences between these wars, and wars of the future.
Teaching and Learning Sequence:
My classroom will be arranged in the perimeter style, with the desks creating a "U" formation with the center of the "U" facing the blackboard or the whiteboard. I do this so that all of my students have a full view of each other, the board at the front of the classroom, and the speaker presenting information at the time (often the teacher).
Day 1:
Introduce class with slideshow hook (5 minutes).
Start short discussion about what a civil war is. Brainstorm some reasons why they occur (10 minutes).
Time will be spent elaborating upon the revolt of Spartacus and the slaves. (20 minutes).
There will be a quick review of Caesar’s Civil War, and it will be compared to Spartacus’ revolt. (10 minutes).
Students will use “Inspiration” to map out the timeline of both civil wars, side by side, and will be asked to compare and contrast the instigators and major historical figures in each war. (20 minutes)
Students will create a concept web, highlighting the major historical themes in each civil war, and comparing them. (15 minutes)
Students taking five minutes to come up with a question that they would like answered for next class. This can be a clarifying question, or it can be a question about something that was not discussed that day, or about something they might have prior knowledge in. (5 minutes)
Day 2:
Students will begin the class by writing a short paragraph about their ideas on the nature of civil war in the ancient world based on what they learned last class. (5 minutes).
There will be a short discussion about the classes conclusions about civil war so far. (5 minutes)
Students will then be introduced to the Revolt in Judea by reading from the textbook. (10 minutes)
There will then be a lecture by the teacher, giving more in-depth information about the Revolt in Judea, it’s origins, and the war’s nature. (15 minutes)
The students will then return to “Inspiration” and add a second timeline and word web to compare the Revolt in Judea with Spartacus’ Revolt and Caesar’s Civil War. (10 minutes)
Students will spend the rest of class constructing an essay comparing the three wars. (30 minutes)
Students will use the remainder of the time to record their thoughts in their journals. (5 minutes)

Students will understand that Ancient Rome experienced multiple civil wars and periods of internal strife. Civil war and strife are themes that encompass all of history, and have affected every major civilization throughout history. This lesson prescribes to the Maine Learning Results for Social Studies, more specifically in the History Concentration, finally focusing on "Historical Knowledge, Concepts, Themes and Patterns." Students will watch a slide-show which cycles through artistic renderings of the different civil wars experienced by Rome.
Where, Why, What, Hook, Tailors: Visual/Spatial

Students will know about Julius Caesar, Spartacus, The Slave Revolt, Judea, Josephus, Revolt in Judea. Students will use "Inspiration" to make their own graphic organizer, in the form of a concept map, to show the different causes for different civil wars. Students will keep track of the different answers to the causes of the different civil wars in a journal and they will reflect upon the causes and the motivations behind the different key players.

Equip, Explore Rethink, Revise Tailors: Visual/Spatial, Logical/Mathematical, Intrapersonal
Students will use "Inspiration" to make their own graphic organizer, in the form of a concept map, to show the different causes for different civil wars. Students will group up in teams of four and use the "Round Robin Brainstorming" to think up the different causes and effects for the different civil wars being studied. Students will keep track of the different answers to the causes of the different civil wars in a journal and they will reflect upon the causes and the motivations behind the different key players.

Explore, Experience, Rethink, Revise, Refine, Tailors: Visual/Spatial, Interpersonal

Students will be given journals at the beginning of the unit, in which they will write and record their findings, what they thought about what was being taught, and what they might be confused about or might need clarified. These journals will give students time to reflect and think about what they have learned, and about what they might need to improve upon in the future. They will be given the chance to write in these journals at the end of every class.
Evaluate, Tailors: Interpersonal

Content Notes

Julius Caesar: Famous general, consul, and dictator of Rome, and member of the first Triumvirate. His political ambitions was one of the causes of a civil war which divided Rome into two different camps: the Optimates (Pompey) and Populares.
Spartacus: Gladiator and slave who led the slave revolt in Rome during the first century.
The Slave Revolt of Spartacus: An unsuccessful revolt in which slaves and gladiators attempted to gain their freedom from the Romans. Once defeated by the legions of Crassus, many were crucified along the Appian Way, the main road of the Roman Empire.
Judea: The Roman province that existed in what is now Israel. It was in this province that the First and Second Jewish Wars took place.
Josephus: An affluent Jewish priest and the leader of the Jewish rebellion in the First Jewish War. He was captured by the Roman general Vespasian, and was let free when the more pressing matter of the death of Emperor Nero arose.
First Jewish War: In 66 CE when a chamber-pot was emptied near a synagogue. The Jews rioted, and the Roman Governor of Judea called the Jewish community leaders and asked them to produce the rioters, and when the leaders claimed no knowledge of who rioted the governor ordered the local troops to kill anyone in the local market. This incident was the catalyst for the First Jewish War. The war ended in 70 CE when the general Titan sacked and destroyed the Temple in Jerusalem, and afterwards many Jews left Judea.
Handouts:
Checklist
Content Notes
“Rome and Judea” Handout


Lesson 5 Checklist

Julius Caesar: _
Spartacus: _
The Slave Revolt of Spartacus: _
Judea: _
Josephus: _
First Jewish War: _


Pre Assessment

What do you know already about civil wars? What do you think you know?
What would you like to know about civil wars in Rome?
Do you know about Julius Caesar, Spartacus, and Josephus? If yes, then explain what it is.
Would you feel confidant being tested on this material?


Post Assessment

What have you learned about civil war in Rome?
What would you still like to know, or what do you still not know about civil war in Rome?
Who were Julius Caesar, Spartacus, and Nero?
Would you feel confidant being tested on this material?